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A guide to heating your home room by room

At this time of year, we typically prefer to turn our heating off as the temperature outside gets warmer, but our homes still need to feel comfortable during the summer months (even in Ireland when the summer months can still be cold and damp). Having your home comfortably warm means that you need the right temperature in every room – your house shouldn’t be the same temperature throughout though.

It’s normal for your living room to be slightly warmer than your bedroom, and your bedroom can be a few degrees colder without feeling too chilly because you’ll have blankets to maintain your body temperature while you sleep. Aside from turning your heating on, are there other ways to heat your home, room by room?

Bedroom

Your bedroom should be a comfortable 16-18oC, which seems quite cool, but overheating at night can lead to more serious health issues as well as a restless night. If you don’t want to rely solely on your home heating oil to maintain a comfortable temperature in your bedroom at night, why not consider the alternative options for this room?

Thermal curtains can block draughts from windows and make your space feel warmer, and if you feel cold at night, a thicker duvet or an extra blanket will help you feel warmer without having to resort to having the heating on.

Living Room

Typically, we spend a lot of time in the living rooms sitting still, so it needs to be a few degrees warmer so that you can sit comfortably in this room watching TV or reading without feeling a chill. Heating this room can be trickier as we all tend to have our furniture pushed up against the wall blocking the radiators, and making it harder for the warm air to circulate. If you can, pull larger furniture a few inches away from the wall to allow hot air from the radiators to heat the room more effectively.

You can also add draught excluders to the bottom of doors or even a chimney balloon if you don’t light the fire to prevent warm air from escaping up the chimney.

Bathroom

The bathroom can be a tricky room to get the temperature right. The humid conditions can often lead to mould build up, and with your towel rails normally occupied there’s little opportunity to keep warm air circulating around this space. Always open a window after you’ve finished showering or having a bath to allow the condensation to escape, and make sure your towels are folded and put away once dry so the room benefits more from the towel rail or radiator when your heating is switched on.

Kitchen

The kitchen is often the heart of the home, but as they can vary in size from large open plan spaces to narrow galley style kitchens, heating this space will often depend on the individual design. If you have radiators in your kitchen, try not to block them with other furniture or appliances. If you use your oven to cook, leave the door open afterwards to allow the hot air to circulate and heat the space without having to use your heating.

Hallway

Your hallway is typically a space in your home that you spend very little time, so you won’t need to have your radiators turned up full here as it would be a waste. Instead, it would be better to insulate this space – seal your letter box and have a wall mounted post box instead to cut down on draughts.

Add a thick runner to your hallway to make it feel cosier, and curtains hanging by the door will not only dress the window but cut down on draughts from around the window and door frame.